Sunday, December 29, 2013

Friday, December 6, 2013

Thanksgiving 2013

Farm Thanksgiving: Farm to Plate

Farmer Fahler admiring his turkey and making gravy
This year's Thanksgiving felt like Christmas for us here on the farm. We had farm raised Narragansett Turkey, homegrown potatoes, shell peas, and corn we'd saved from the garden, as well as carrots and turnips from the greenhouse! For desert we had pumpkin pie and pumpkin cheesecake pie from one of the Musquee de Provence pumpkins we grew, and tried a new pie shell pastries made with lard from the pigs and is now one of our favorite pie shell recipes. We've also been enjoying our farm-raised bacon and eggs for breakfast and zucchini bread from some frozen zucchini from the garden.  

For us, Thanksgiving was a great day filled with good, homegrown food and visiting family. It felt like all we had to buy for Thanksgiving was dairy and bread products! And soon, with Rosie the farm cow showing her pregnancy more and more each day, dairy won't be a problem!

This is our first year producing most of our own food, raising our Thanksgiving turkey from tiny chick to 15 lbs of dressed crispy meat. So we'd like to review our first year with turkeys.

We got our turkey poults at around 1 week old from the owner of a local pet store, five Narragansett poults and one Bourbon Red. We ended up with one male, who we uncreatively called Tom, and five females. 



After a few weeks in a brooder box under a heat lamp, we moved them outside to "The Turkey Hut" with branches for roosts and a small run for them to go outside. We clipped their wings for the first few months to keep them from flying over their fence, or on top of their shelter. This worked for the most part, except for the Bourbon Red who always seemed to be outside of their coop. Since we were always on the look out for this turkey, we named her Waldo. 


The turkeys quickly ate all the vegetation in their enclosure, so we let them free range sometimes on the farm. They wandered all over the farm, into the pig pasture, in the garden, and once out onto the road. When they started to jump up onto the roof of our house or try to roost in a large tree for the night, we decided to limit their free ranging. 


We raised these six turkeys for six months, May-November, feeding them greens and sunflowers from the garden, and non-medicated feed from our local feed mill. 


We were fortunate enough to have a friend who has a bucket plucker, and he let us borrow it for the processing. It made processing day go so much quicker! Farmer Fahler handled the killing cones, scalding and plucking part of processing. 

Meanwhile, Farmer Figgins was inside doing the evisceration, cleaning, quality control and bagging. Cleaning a turkey isn't much different from cleaning a chicken--take the head, neck, oil gland, and legs off, then remove the crop and internal organs. 

Narragansett turkeys are a heritage breed and at maturity typically have a live weight of 14 pounds for hens and 23 pounds for toms. Dressed weight is typically 75% of live weight, so toms should come in at about 17 lbs and hens around 10. Heritage breed turkeys are generally smaller than the typical broad breasted white you get at the supermarket. Our hens came in a little under weight than we'd have liked, with Tom at 15 lbs and our hens at 7 lbs, dressed. We also noticed that Tom had more fat around his neck and breast than the hens. 



Next year we'd like to do a few turkeys again, but we'd like to allow them more ranging area to exercise, Tom in particular had a pretty fatty neck. With more space to roam and more grass to graze, we're hoping for fatter and healthier birds next year!  



Sunday, November 17, 2013

Pasture Raised Pork Cuts For Sale

Pasture Raised Pork Cuts For Sale


We are sold out of whole and half hogs for 2013, we took the last batch of hogs to the processor last Wednesday. For those of you who did not get the opportunity to order a hog, or do not have enough freezer space for a whole or half hog, you're in luck! 

We have some pork cuts available for sale so you can try some of our amazingly delicious 
pasture-raised, heritage breed pork! To read more about our Berkshire cross pigs and how 
we raise them, visit our Pasture Raised Pork Page





The cuts available include:

-Thick 1" Pork Chops - $6.00/lb
-Nice Pork Steaks which have fantastic marbling.  - $5.00/lb
-Smoked Bacon - $8.00/lb 
-Smoked Ham Steaks which make a great breakfast!  - $3.50/Steak
-Seasoned Sausage which makes fantastic biscuits and gravy!  -  $5.00/1 lb package
-Loin and Shoulder Roasts, typically weighing 3-4lbs.  -  $4.50/lb
-Spare Ribs - $4.50/lb
Download our Pork Order Form, fill it in and send it to us as ShireFarmMI@gmail.com or print it out and mail it to us at The Shire Farm, 3327 E. Boyer Road, Sheridan, MI 48884. We will assemble your order and you can arrange your pick up time with us. 




The pigs enjoying pumpkins, tomatoes, and melons after we moved them on the CSA garden plot

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Farm Update November

November Farm Update


Well it's full fledged fall here at the Shire with the first signs of winter.  We've  been thankful to avoid any snow so far, that's right all of you in Colorado are getting a colder and worse fall than us so far.  We have been having a lot of rain though which certainly has made some muddy messes for us as we try and get everything prepped for winter.  

The pigs are in their final weeks on the farm.  We've taken 6 pigs to processor so far, and they have all weighed in around and a little over 180 lbs which is right where we wanted them.   We've let them into the garden for the last few weeks, and they've done a great job cleaning it up for us.  We really strongly believe that a farm must be diverse, because all the diferent enterprises here on the farm help or support one another.  Pigs love "rooting," or using their noses to dig up the ground to find tasty treats,  which many farmers try to avoid by confining the animals to very specific locations, keeping on concrete floors, or putting metal rings in their snouts.  We have employed this unique talent of the pigs to remove a section of grass we wanted to replant as a pasture mix, and now have saved ourselves hours of work cleaning up the garden.  This means we save time and money on equipment use and maintenance, as well as save money on feeding the pigs.  What a win-win situation.  

We have decided to keep one gilt (an unbred female pig), to become our farm sow (female pig used to breed).  Therefore the official winner of the Game of Sows is Arya.  Arya is a 3/4 Berkshire 1/4 Duroc cross,  which I like to call our miniature holstein (the large spotted cows seen at any major dairy) because she is white with black spots.  She was a super quick grower, out growing everyone else in the bunch.  She is very independent not rubbing against us everytime we go into the pig pens, but she also is easy to handle which was a big factor for our breeding stock.  


Arya along with her 3 remaining companions.  Also notice how tilled the garden looks.

The greenhouse is serving us very nicely.   We've been eating a lot of fresh greens out of the greenhouse and with the rich mix of compost and topsoil we filled it with, the crops are doing the best of any on the farm so far.  We are currently growing lettuce, spinach, arugula, turnips, radishes, cilantro, and kohlrabi in the greenhouse, and certainly could be doing much more but due to the late start we went only with short season crops when we planted at the beginning of September.    




In Cow news we've had some interesting developments.  When we picked up Rosie in May, she had been out running with a bull for about 2 months, so we expected her to be pregnant when we got her.  After having the vet come out and check her out we were told she was not in fact pregnant.  We were disappointed, but looked at the bright side, at least we wouldn't have a calf between December and February.  We then spent the next few months trying to keep track of what we thought were her heat cycles.  We then took Rosie to Shamrock Acres Dexter Farm to have her bred to a smaller cow breed, the Dexter.  When we got her back, after about 8 weeks, we had her checked again to see if she took.  The good news is that she is pregnant!  The surprise was that she is about 4-5 months pregnant according to the vet.  What this means is that she must have been only a week or two pregnant when we first checked her in the spring.  So we are now expecting a calf in late January or early February.  


This is her sultry look over the shoulder and MOO pose.  

Otherwise both of us have been keeping busy trying to balance our farm work with our winter jobs.  Farmer Figgins is working at Buzz Wireless in Ionia, right by Little Caesars Pizza, usually in the evening.  I (Farmer Don) am at Menards again this winter.  Feel free to drop in and say hello to either of us, I can usually be found in the hardware section of Menards in the mornings and early afternoons   

It's time now for me to go get some more cleanup done around the farm, as the recent wind blew most of the remaining leaves out of the trees.  

Sunday, October 20, 2013

Farm Update: Fall

Farm Update: Fall



Fall is here, the garden is waning and the leaves are turning. All good things must come to an end. We had a great first season for our CSA, 17 weeks! Since then we've been gleaning what was left in the garden for ourselves, enjoying the last of the harvest and freezing extras for the winter. 


Last Wednesday we took 3 of our largest hogs to Jones Farm Market to be processed. We're looking forward to picking up our own whole hog soon and enjoying some great, farm-raised meat! We were delightfully surprised by how affordable our prices are for a half hog. Only $275.00 for a year's worth of pork for a family of two! We still have a few hogs available for pre-order, check out our Pasture-Raised Pork page if you're interested and get your deposit in soon! We'll be taking the next batch to the processor on October 28!

On Thursday we moved the remaining 7 pigs onto half of the garden. Though we've had days of rain, they're loving rooting in the mud for the last melons, green pumpkins, small watermelons, and ugly tomatoes that remained in the garden. A nice change from all the apples they've been eating!


On Monday we brought back Rosie from her vacation at Shamrock Acres Dexter Farm in Hudsonville. She stayed there for 2 months, and we're hoping for a calf and lots of milk in May/June! The resulting cross between a Jersey and Dexter cow is called a Belfair. They are beefy enough to raise a bull calf for meat and are faster than full Jersey. 




In the greenhouse our fall planting has been flourishing in the autumn weather!



Lettuce heads are nearing harvest size



We can't even keep up with the radishes! 


The swiss chard is looking great! Too bad mice keep eating our kale!


We also harvested the sunflowers that we had planted around our pumpkin patch, they're hanging and drying out in the barn with a tarp below to catch any fallen seeds. Soon we'll take the seeds off the flower heads, salt them and store them. We gave all the small heads to the turkeys and chickens, who loved the snack! 


Friday, October 4, 2013

2013 CSA Share #17

CSA Share #17 - The Final Share 


All good things come to an end and the garden has reached it's limit this year.  This will be our final share of 2013, bringing a close to 17 weeks of fresh vegetables grown entirely safe from chemical residues, and hopefully you all found it as delicious and educational as we have.   Not wanting to go out without a bang, we have the largest share of the season!  This week's share also really demonstrates the variety we can have in our vegetables--the last of the summer crops like tomatoes and peppers, those long season fall crops like pumpkins and winter squash, and fall planting of root crops coming with the impending cold. 

We had a fruitful season for our first year, we loved meeting all of our shareholders and delivering fresh, local produce to you all. We've had our challenges and learning opportunities aplenty--poor sandy soil, bugs and disease problems. But with these experiences and our new greenhouse we hope to have a earlier, bigger and better start on the season next year, and a longer season as well! Until next year! 

Pictured is a Full Share for Week 17.  6 Pumpkins (2 Jack-0-lantern, 4 pumpkin pie), 4 Melons, 4 Butternut Squash, 2 Watermelon, 4 Acorn Squash, 4 Spaghetti Squash, 2 lbs Bell Peppers, Carrots, 4 Leeks, 6 heirloom slicing tomatoes, 8 lbs of assorted Tomatoes,  8 Apples, 2 Jalapenos, 6 Thai Peppers, 6 Kohlrabi and 6 Turnips.Full Share Only: Radishes, Beets, 2 Eggplant

Winter Squash

Winter squash are the last summer vegetables harvested from a garden, and can keep for several months after harvest. For best storage, winter squash need to be cured, which can be done in the home or a heated outbuilding. To cure, place the fruit in an area where temperatures approach 80 degrees for about 10 to 14 days, out of direct sunlight. After cured you can use them for display or put them in a winter storage site, usually a cool, well-ventilated place such as an open basement area, with a consistent temperature of about 50 degrees. The exception to this is acorn squash, these will keep only 6-8 weeks. 

The best thing about winter squash is that they can be stored and saved for later, after all the fresh produce that has a freshness deadline have been cooked. So when all the goodies of this share are gone, try some of these great recipes! 






Apples

More apples for everyone this week! We recently met the farm's previous owners and learned which varieties we have. This week we have 4 MacIntosh and 4 Golden Delicious for all of our shares, enough for apple pie!



Pumpkins

Fall is here, the leaves are turning and its time for some pumpkin pie! Full Shares get 2 Jack-O-Lantern pumpkins for carving, 2 Pumpkin Pie pumpkins (the small round ones) and 2 Musque de Provence (the lobed, cinderella-like pumpkin). Both the pumpkin pie and musque de provence pumpkins can be used for making pumpkin puree for pumpkin pie made from scratch! Now say pumpkin 10 times in a row.



Purple-Top Turnips

Store your turnip roots in a bag in the fridge for up to one week. You can substitute turnips for potatoes in most recipes, including our Creamy Fall Vegetable soup, or you can try them mashed like potatoes with chives and bacon! 



Sauteed Turnip Greens


Leeks

Leeks are in the onion family, but rather than forming a tight bulb like an onion, leeks produce a long cylinder of bundled leaf sheaths. They have a mild onion-like taste, the edible portions are the white base of the leaves, the light green parts, and to a lesser extent the dark green parts of the leaves. Leeks are popular for adding flavor to stock, for which you can use all of the leaves. Try them boiled, fried, or raw on salads. Our favorite way to use them is in potato leek soup!

Potato Leek Soup

Our Stock Recipe


Melons

This week every full share will get 4 of our heirloom melons.  The small cantaloupe make great snacks and are some of the sweetest melons you will ever eat.  Eat these fast because they don't have a long shelf life! 

Watermelon

Enjoy the last of summer's favorite fruit, watermelons. We've got Moon and Stars watermelon, our white fleshed Cream Saskatchewan, or the Crimson Sweet this week. 



Tomatoes

The tomato plants are on their last legs, but they gave us a great final crop!
Full Shares:
-3 lbs of mixed snacking tomatoes (cherry, pear, and peach tomatoes)
-3 lbs of roma and sheboygan tomatoes (great for salsa, pasta sauce or bruschetta)
-2 lbs of Rutgers slicer tomatoes (for hamburgers, sauce, salsa or sandwiches)
-6 Heirloom Slicers (either Kellogg's Breakfast or Aunt Ruby's German Green both great for BLT sandwiches, and also make some very colorful bruschetta!)

Half shares:
-1.5 lb of mixed snacking tomatoes (cherry, pear, and peach tomatoes)
-1.5 lbs of roma and sheboygan tomatoes (great for salsa, marinara sauce or bruschetta)
-1 lb Rutgers slicer tomatoes (for hamburgers, sauce, or sandwiches)
-3 Heirloom Slicer (either Kellogg's Breakfast or Aunt Ruby's German Green)

Check our 2013 Tomato Varieties blogpost to see which ones you get and match the tomato to it's name! For using all these tomatoes, we recommend making lots of salsa, tomato salad and bruschetta. Freeze some bruschetta, can some salsa or marinara sauce! To use up those bell peppers and jalapenos, try canning some delicious zesty salsa!

Zesty Salsa Canning Recipe

Peppers


We've got more peppers for everyone this week.  We have several bell peppers, the last of the Jalapenos, and some Thai peppers.  

Full Shares:
-2 lbs of bell peppers
-6 Thai peppers
-2 Jalapenos

Half Shares:
-1 lb of bell peppers
-3 Thai Peppers
-1 Jalapeno

You can use the bell peppers and jalapenos in the zesty salsa recipe.  You can also try stuffed bell peppers!  You can add the small Thai Peppers to a stir fry and give it a little heat.  This is a hotter pepper so be careful with how much you use, one or two will usually do the trick.  




Carrots

More carrots this week--eat them on salad, in soup, or just raw, you can't go wrong! 



Kohlrabi


More Kohlrabi this week!  Just peel the skin and bite into it like an apple, or slice it and enjoy with your favorite salad dressing. 



Radish (full shares only)

This week we have 2 varieties for you, the white Ping Pong radish and the longer red French Breakfast variety. We really like the French Breakfast, its a little sweeter and milder in taste, great for getting your kids to try out radishes. Our favorite snack is lightly toasted bread with butter and sliced radishes, give it a try! 

Don't forget, you can use those greens! Sautee them for 2-3 minutes in garlic and butter, or make one of our favorite soups Radish Leaf Soup, we like to substitute homemade stock for the water to give it extra flavor!

Radish Leaf Soup


Eggplant (full shares only)


This week we have 2 Eggplant for full shares only, they've been slowing down with the cold. Next year we'll have more eggplant for longer, we'll be starting them inside our new greenhouse and growing some inside as well for an extended harvest!  Eggplant is in the same family as tomatoes and potatoes and was first domesticated in India. We have the large black Italian variety, perfect for ratatouille or eggplant parmesan. Raw eggplant can have a somewhat bitter taste, but becomes tender when cooked and develops a rich, complex flavor. The flesh is smooth and meaty, capable of absorbing large amounts of cooking fats and sauces, making for very rich dishes and making it a great meat substitute for vegan and vegetarian dishes!




Beets (full shares only)

This root crop is one we are still learning to love ourselves.  The most common use we know of is Borscht a eastern european soup.  Many people like to shred them to add to a salad.  We've also heard of people pickling them for a snack.




Thursday, September 26, 2013

2013 CSA Share #16

CSA Share #16


We've got a huge share for everyone this week! Fall is here, and cold nights and frosty mornings are slowing down the garden and bringing an end to the season. We still have a lot of harvest though and a few fall specialities like pumpkins this week!   This will be our second to last share so enjoy, and we'll see you all next week for our finalĂ©.

Full Share pictured: 2 Jack-O-Lantern pumpkins, 2 pumpkin pie pumpkins, and 2 Musque de Provence pumpkins.  4 watermelons (2 red fleshed, 2 white), 4 Melons (not pictured, oops), 2 heirloom slicing tomatoes, 3 lbs Rutgers tomatoes, 4 lbs assorted Roma type tomatoes, 3 lbs assorted snacking tomatoes (cherry, pear, and peach), large bunch beets, 2 bunches swiss chard and kale, 2 lbs bell peppers, 18 habanero peppers, 10 thai peppers, 10 jalapeno peppers, 2 bunches green onions, 4 kohlrabi, 1/2 lb arugula, 8 apples (4 Macintosh, 4 Golden Delicious), and 1 bunch of Parsley
Full Share Only: large  bunch of radishes, 3 eggplant, and 1 cabbage

Pumpkins

Fall is upon us and this week our CSA members get the first of the pumpkins! Full Shares get 2 Jack-O-Lantern pumpkins for carving, 2 Pumpkin Pie pumpkins (the small round ones) and 2 Musque de Provence (the lobed, cinderella-like pumpkin). Both the pumpkin pie and musque de provence pumpkins can be used for making pumpkin puree for pumpkin pie made from scratch! Now say pumpkin 10 times in a row.

From Scratch Pumpkin Pie Recipe

Watermelons

Many more watermelons this week! We've got two heirloom varieties for everyone this week, the Moon and Stars, named after the yellow spots that develop on the outside like, well, moon and stars. The other variety is a smaller, round watermelon called Cream Saskatchewan  which has sweet white flesh but a very thin rind. So handle with care, we had a few pop and break on us! Did you know, A USDA study found that the tart white rind of watermelons offers a high dose of citrulline, an amino acid that helps dilate blood vessels to improve circulation. You can make a yummy drink out of the rind, check here for some ideas. 

Watermelon Rind Drink

Melons

This week every full share will get 4 of our heirloom melons.  These make great snacks and are some of the sweetest melons you will ever eat.  Eat these fast because they don't have a long shelf life!

Apples

More apples for everyone this week! We recently met the farm's previous owners and learned which varieties we have. This week we have 4 MacIntosh and 4 Golden Delicious for our Full Shares. 

Tomatoes


Our tomato plants are heavy with ripening fruit for everyone to enjoy this week!  We've had two light frosts already however, and the plants are feeling it, this may be our last week for tomatoes! We recommend whipping up some salsa since we have lots of jalapenos and other peppers to go with these tomatoes.

Full Shares:
-3 lbs of mixed snacking tomatoes (cherry, pear, and peach tomatoes)
-4 lbs of roma and sheboygan tomatoes (great for salsa, pasta sauce or bruschetta)
-2 lbs of Rutgers slicer tomatoes (for hamburgers, sauce, salsa or sandwiches)
-2 Heirloom Slicers (either Kellogg's Breakfast or Aunt Ruby's German Green both great for BLT sandwiches!)

Half shares:
-1.5 lb of mixed snacking tomatoes (cherry, pear, and peach tomatoes)
-2 lbs of roma and sheboygan tomatoes (great for salsa, marinara sauce or bruschetta)
-1 lb Rutgers slicer tomatoes (for hamburgers, sauce, or sandwiches)
-1 Heirloom Slicer (either Kellogg's Breakfast or Aunt Ruby's German Green)

Check our 2013 Tomato Varieties blogpost to see which ones you get and match the tomato to it's name! For using all these tomatoes, we recommend making lots of salsa, tomato salad and bruschetta. We've been glad to hear that many of your have been doing so! Now is the time to start preserving the harvest folks! Freeze some bruschetta, can some salsa or marinara sauce! To use up those bell peppers and jalapenos, try canning some delicious zesty salsa!

Zesty Salsa Canning Recipe

Peppers


We've got lots more peppers for everyone this week!

Full Shares:
-10 Jalapenos
-10 Thai Peppers
-2 lbs of Bell Peppers
-18 Habanero Peppers

Half Shares:
-5 Jalapenos
-10 Thai Peppers
-1 lbs of Bell Peppers
-9 Habanero Peppers

You can use the bell peppers, habaneros, and Jalapenos in the zesty salsa recipe. We have lots of bell peppers for you this week, we recommend them for the salsa, or try some stuffed bell peppers! If you don't end up using them all, preserve the harvest! Here's a handy site with all sorts of ideas for preserving your bell peppers. Habaneros are new for us this year, try some Jerk Chicken with a Mango-Habanero Sauce, or Habanero-Lime Cheesecake! We've also got Thai Peppers for everyone this week, small green peppers that are very hot! Try some Pad Thai or Thai Pumpkin Soup with these. 








Kohlrabi



More Kohlrabi this week!  Just peel the skin and bite into it like an apple, or slice it and enjoy with your favorite salad dressing. 

Green Onions 

A little more green onions for everyone this week. With a milder taste than onion, you can use both the small bulbs and the green stem. We love to use green onions on salad, in soups, as a pizza topping, in salsa, or in stir-frys. 

Tip: You can also make your green onions last longer by putting the exposed roots in an inch of water in a container in the fridge. 

Beets

We have some beets finally this week as well.  This root crop is one we are still learning to love ourselves.  The most common use we know of is Borscht a eastern european soup.  Many people like to shred them to add to a salad.  And our friend Roger Kammers of Hamblin Auto Body likes to pickle them as a special snack!

Borscht

Swiss Chard and Kale

This week our shares get to enjoy kale and more Swiss Chard. Swiss chard is another extremely healthy green that helps regulate blood sugar and a great source of anti-oxidants. Try the swiss chard as a side dish, with this easy Savory Swiss Chard recipe. Our favorite way to enjoy these greens is by tearing the leaves into strips and sauteing them in olive oil and garlic with some salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes. 




Arugula


This week we have more Arugula for you! Add these to your lettuce heads or make them a meal in themselves. Want to splurge on a delicious salad? Add pine nuts and crumbled goat cheese with sunflower oil as your dressing, you won't regret it!

We also like making sandwiches with the mix.  We had some great bread from the farmer's market,  smeared some goat cheese on the bread and stuffed it with arugula and it was excellent!

Radishes (full shares only)

The heat has plumped up this fall planting of radishes! This week we have 2 varieties for you, the white Ping Pong radish and the longer red French Breakfast variety. We really like the French Breakfast, its a little sweeter and milder in taste, great for getting your kids to try out radishes. Our favorite snack is lightly toasted bread with butter and sliced radishes, give it a try! 

Don't forget, you can use those greens! Sautee them for 2-3 minutes in garlic and butter, or make one of our favorite soups Radish Leaf Soup, we like to substitute homemade stock for the water to give it extra flavor!


Eggplant (full shares only)


This week we have 3 Eggplant for full shares only, they've been slowing down with the cold and not producing enough for everyone. Next year we'll have more eggplant for longer, we'll be starting them inside our new greenhouse and growing some inside as well for an extended harvest!  Eggplant is in the same family as tomatoes and potatoes and was first domesticated in India. We have the large black Italian variety, perfect for ratatouille or eggplant parmesan. Raw eggplant can have a somewhat bitter taste, but becomes tender when cooked and develops a rich, complex flavor. The flesh is smooth and meaty, capable of absorbing large amounts of cooking fats and sauces, making for very rich dishes and making it a great meat substitute for vegan and vegetarian dishes!



Cabbage (full shares only)

This week we have cabbage heads for our full shares. These store well, and we've been enjoying them in eggrolls. We shred up 2 cups cabbage, 1/2 c carrots, 1/2 c radish, and 1/4 c sprouts, some green onions, then adding 1-2 tbsp of soy sauce and rolling 2 tbsp of the mixture in egg roll wraps. Fry it in peanut or canola oil and enjoy!